Tag Archives: barbecue

Flavors of the Great River Road: Arkansas

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Arkansas’ Delta Byways region is home to outstanding Southern flavors, from catfish to tamales to award-winning barbecue. Plus, the state’s fertile farmlands are home to soybeans, rice and more. Here’s a quick look at some of the best tastes to seek out in your trip through the Natural State.

Barbecue. You might not expect to find a James Beard award-winning restaurant in the Arkansas Delta, but a visit to Jones’ Bar-B-Q Diner in Marianna will show you what the fuss is all about. The Jones family has been serving locals—and since their Beard Award win, people from all over the world—for more than 100 years. Stop by this nondescript diner for some great food and a true taste of the South.

Tamales. Like its neighbor Mississippi to the east, Arkansas celebrates the mixing of many cultures in its cuisine. Take the tamale, which can be found at restaurants big and small throughout the Delta. A blink-and-you’ll-miss it spot to check out in Lake Village is Rhoda’s Famous Hot Tamales, which is famous for its coffee can-packed tamales (a dozen in each that you can take home).

Delta Cultural Center. Learn about the history and heritage of the Arkansas Delta at this unique museum in Helena. Explore exhibits that examine the history of the area, starting with early settlements on rich croplands. Speaking of food, the Delta Cultural Center has been the home of the King Biscuit Radio Show—the longest-running daily blues radio show in the United States—since 1990. Stop by from 12:15 to 12:45pm Monday through Friday to listen to “Sunshine” Sonny Payne broadcast live.

Lake Chicot State Park. Want to catch your own meal? Lake Chicot is an angling haven, whether you’re going after catfish or crappie and bass.

(Photos courtesy of Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism)

Flavors of the Great River Road: Kentucky

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Kentucky and its neighboring Southern states often get lumped together in the food category. Southern cuisine, however, is a blanket term that covers a diversely wide range of dishes that are nuanced in flavor, preparation and history. The Kentucky food scene is proof that Southern cooking is not only delicious, but downright unexpected, with something new around every corner. Here’s a look at some of the culinary specialties you can find along the Kentucky Great River Road.

Barbecue

You can’t go to the Bluegrass State without digging into some famous Kentucky barbecue. From beef brisket to dry-rubbed ribs to the more unique mutton barbecue you’ll find along the Ohio River in north-central Kentucky, there’s something for every barbecue-loving palate. When you’re traveling along the Kentucky Great River Road, don’t miss Kentucky Hillbilly BBQ in Wickliffe and Bardwell.

Burgoo

Burgoo is a Kentucky specialty. The dish is a hodgepodge of various meats, vegetables and spices, but it’s mostly a fun opportunity for ambitious chefs to put their skills to the test. Here’s a look at a few burgoo recipes you can try on your own.

Bourbon

A trip to Kentucky is incomplete without sampling some delicious bourbon. While most of the distilleries are concentrated in the center of the state, you can find products from Kentucky makers big and small (like those distilleries on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail and the Kentucky Craft Bourbon Trail) throughout the state, including along the Great River Road.

But Kentucky’s expertise in spirits extends beyond bourbon. To get a better taste, check out The Moonshine Company in Paducah, just a short drive off the Kentucky Great River Road. This distillery is operated by the descendants of Uncle Mosey, whose white whiskey moonshine recipe was one of Al Capone’s favorites during the Prohibition Era.

Hot brown

This famous sandwich, invented at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, is a classic Kentucky dish that can be found throughout the state. An open-faced sandwich that consists of turkey, bacon, tomatoes and a generous helping of cheese, the Hot Brown should be on your must-eat list in Kentucky. Read more about the origin of this sandwich and find a recipe from its namesake hotel here.

Sides

There’s no shortage of scrumptious sides to complete your plate in Kentucky. With recipes like Silver Queen sweet corn and Kentucky Wonder green beans, you’ll want a second helping of vegetables. Don’t forget to order a bowl of white beans and corn bread. If you want to try something truly unique to Kentucky, ask for beaten biscuits. Making these rolls requires antique cookware and tedious mixing methods, but the result is unforgettable.

Kentucky is home to culinary experimentation, practice and perfection. From its barbeque to its burgoo and, of course, its bourbon, the Bluegrass State has plenty to offer to the foodie in every traveler.

Flavors of the Great River Road: Tennessee

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Savor the flavors of the South when you explore the Great River Road through Tennessee. From barbecue to bananas—yes, bananas—and everything in between, there’s plenty to whet your appetite.

When it comes to cuisine along Tennessee’s Great River Road, the undisputed king has got to be Memphis. (All apologies to Memphis’ other king, Mr. Presley.) Memphis is a city that boasts history, culture and personality in a bundle that can’t be beat. It has everything to offer from stellar live music venues to can’t-miss historical spots. Among these one-of-a-kind traits are the flavors of Memphis—especially barbecue. Locals have been perfecting their craft for centuries here, making a science out of sweet-and-spicy combos that you can now find in a variety of Memphis-born dishes.

If you’re looking for a twist on some classic barbecue, head over to Central BBQ for their signature BBQ nachos. That’s right—these chips are loaded with your choice of chicken, beef or turkey and topped with barbecue sauce, assorted cheeses, jalapenos and a dusting of BBQ Shake. This favorite has been featured on several foodie blogs and has the local seal of approval.

A critic’s favorite is the dry-rub ribs at Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous, a diner located across the street from the famous Peabody Hotel. The cooks here have perfected the Memphis tradition of using dry rub instead of barbecue sauce for ribs you’ve only tasted in your dreams.

A food tour through Tennessee wouldn’t be complete without experiencing the sweeter side of the menu. You might be familiar with Elvis Presley’s favorite lunch, a peanut butter and banana sandwich. But did you know that Tennessee actually has a connection to the banana industry? The Kentucky-Tennessee border cities of Fulton and South Fulton were once home to the only facility for distributing bananas to the northern states, so it became known as “The Banana Capital of the World.” Locals are so proud of their role in bringing bananas to the United States that they still celebrate the Annual Banana Festival every September.

If you’re looking to catch a few flavors of your own, head westward from South Fulton to Reelfoot Lake. It’s home to Reelfoot Lake State Park, a nationally renowned fishing destination for anglers going after crappie and bluegill. Plus, Reelfoot Lake—the only natural lake in Tennessee—welcomes visitors at lodging properties like Blue Bank Resort, which offers delicious cuisine at its Fishhouse Restaurant.

Between barbeque and biscuits, sweet teas and sugary treats, Tennnessee is the perfect place for a food tour you won’t forget. Add these stops to your trip and your taste buds will thank you all the way home.

(Photos: Charles Vergos Rendezvous/Facebook)

Spotlight TN: Memphis Barbecue

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Fill up on Memphis BBQ during your Great River Road stop in Tennessee! This style of barbecue is all about pork ribs, usually marinated with a rub made of herbs and spices and basted during the cooking. Rubs can be wet, dry, mild, spicy or sweet, with or without mopping sauces applied periodically. Tennessee hosts a number of barbecue festivals throughout the year, and features excellent Memphis barbecue restaurants that you can dine at year-round.