Category Archives: Minnesota

Farmer’s Fourth of July

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Celebrate the most important 19th-century holiday, the Fourth of July, with the Kelley Farm staff. Bring a picnic to enjoy on the front lawn while listening to rousing speeches. Play 19th- and 21st-century games and then sample ice cream in the Learning Kitchen. Hours are 10 am-5 pm.

Dairy Weekend

Discover how farmers cared for their dairy cattle in the mid-19th century versus today and meet the cattle of the 1860s and cows of 2018. Help make butter and cottage cheese in the historic house kitchen and sample ice cream and cheeses made in the visitor center’s Learning Kitchen. Hours are 10 am-5 pm June 23 & 24.

Father’s Day

This Father’s Day join the Kelley Farm staff as they work on typical 19th-century farm chores, like woodworking and machinery repairs. Then visit the Farm Lab Barn to explore animal husbandry skills of today.

Fathers are admitted free when accompanied by a child. Hours are 10 am-5 pm.

Farm Animals Weekend

Farm animals have long been an important part of Minnesota’s agriculture. Meet animals and their offspring, watch farmers as they shear off the sheep’s wool coats, and discover how farm animals were used and cared for in the 19th century.

Then meet modern-day animals in the Farm Lab Barn and discover the many ways farm animals continue to impact our lives today. Explore the use of animal products in the historic farmhouse kitchen and the visitor center’s Learning Kitchen.

Hours are 10 am-5 pm June 2 & 3.

Bands on the Boulevard

Enjoy the Minnesota History Center’s new outdoor concert series, Bands on the Boulevard, every Tuesday night in July from 6:30-9 pm. In summer 2018, bands will cover the best of the 1960s music scene in connection with The 1968 Exhibit.

Concert lineup:
July 3: Legendary Percolators Live Band
July 10: Soul Tight Committee
July 17: Saddle Sores
July 24: Ipso Facto
July 31: Rubber Soul

Bands on the Boulevard is offered every Tuesday night in July with music kicking off at 6:30 pm. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to sit on the History Center lawn and food and drinks will be available to purchase from Market House and D’Amico. Come early or stay late after the concert to take advantage of free admission to the museum galleries from 3 to 9 pm.

Bands on the Boulevard is presented by Xcel Energy.

“Mazinaakizige: American Indian Teen Photography” Exhibit

This exhibit in the Minnesota History Center’s Irvine Gallery showcases the work of young Native American artists who came together over 12 weeks to learn the process of digital photography in a guided, supportive and culturally sensitive environment. The artists will show a selection of photographs that empowers their indigenous identity. This exhibit is the culmination of an MNHS partnership program with Two Rivers Gallery.

The photography exhibit is free and open during regular Minnesota History Center hours June 26-September 3.

“Somalis + Minnesota” Exhibit Opening Celebration

Explore Somali culture, from traditional life in Africa, through the massive migration that began in the 1990s, to today’s large, well-established Minnesota Somali community. This exhibit was developed in partnership with the Somali Museum of Minnesota.

On opening day, celebrate with free admission to the museum from 10 am-5 pm, activities for the entire family, and a chance to meet friends and neighbors during a Sambusa Saturday while enjoying a sambusa and Somali tea. Activities are offered through 3 pm and include performances by the Somali Museum Dance Troupe, poetry, storytelling, weaving demonstrations, book signings of Soo Fariista/Come Sit Down: A Somali American Cookbook, film screenings, and an art project to take home.

Free admission is provided by the Knight Foundation and 3M.

World War I Centennial Weekend

Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I in 2018 from 10 am-5 pm Aug. 18 & 19. The “Great War,” as WWI was then called, raged for three years before the US entered the conflict in 1917. America’s participation tipped the balance in favor of the Allied powers and helped end the war in November 1918.

During World War I Weekend, explore the ways this conflict shaped the world we know today and learn about Minnesota’s role in the war. Visit with costumed interpreters and reenactors, watch military demonstrations, stand in a recreated WWI-style trench, and experience what life was like for Minnesotans during this crucial time

Independence Day Celebration

Spend the United States’ birthday at Historic Fort Snelling and explore the history of freedom in 19th-century America. from 10 am-5 pm. Discover how many Americans celebrated the holiday nearly two centuries ago, complete with cannon and musket salutes, military dress parades, fife and drum music, and much more.

But not all Americans viewed Independence Day this way 200 years ago. Visit interactive learning stations around the fort and learn about the struggles for freedom and independence for several different groups of Americans—such as enslaved people, Native Americans, and women—while exploring the question, “What does freedom mean today?”

“Courage and Compassion: Our Shared Story of the Japanese American World War II Experience” Exhibit

This exhibit chronicles the stories of Japanese Americans during and immediately after WWII, and highlights the bravery, integrity, and extraordinary support of Japanese Americans within 10 communities across the country during that turbulent time.

Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, plunged the United States into WWII and forever changed the lives of Japanese Americans across the nation. Those living on the West Coast of the mainland United States were forced from their homes to isolated incarceration camps scattered across the American West and South. Denied their constitutional rights and imprisoned without trial, approximately 120,000 residents of Japanese ancestry—nearly two-thirds of whom were American citizens—were forced to leave their lives behind simply because they looked like the enemy.

Through the use of images, audio and interactive elements, Courage and Compassion provides a 360-degree perspective of the WWII experience of Americans of Japanese ancestry while exploring its relevance today. The exhibit honors everyday people in cities and towns across America who rose above the wartime hysteria to recognize Japanese Americans as friends, neighbors, and fellow citizens.

Courage and Compassion is made possible through a collaboration between Go For Broke National Education Center and select communities across the country. Each community has reached into its past to recognize local voices of conscience that embody the American ideal of justice for all.

Go For Broke collaborated with the Twin Cities Japanese American Citizens League and Historic Fort Snelling to explore the history of the Military Intelligence Service Language School, which trained soldiers as Japanese linguists during WWII and helped shape Minnesota’s Japanese American community today.

This project is funded, in part, by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Site Grant Program. Additional support provided by the Earl K. and Ruth N. Tanbara Fund for Japanese American History in Minnesota.

The exhibit is free and open through Historic Fort Snelling’s open hours and runs through June 30-Sept. 3, 2018.